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How To Watch A Televised Tennis Match

Ron Waite Photo
Ron Waite, USPTR

So, here we are. 2016 has entered with the New Year, and with it, we have a whole new, professional tennis year to enjoy. Soon, we will be treated with great matches from "down under" as the Australian Open is played. We who are north of the equator may envy the warmer weather that accompanies this grand slam event, and for some of us, we may be trapped indoors while snow falls outside.
 
Although most of us simply watch the great competition among the contestants, we can always learn from watching professionals on both tours executing their "trade." However, one has to make a concerted and conscious effort to truly learn things that one can apply to one's game.
 
Over the years, I have learned much by watching the best of best play this great game of ours. Indeed, I have "viewing" and VHS taped matches that go back to the 1990's in my tennis archives. Some of the matches that I have saved on video over the years have not involved the "name" players. Whenever there is a match from which I can benefit and learn, I make an effort to analyze it carefully, make copious viewing notes, and review the match on multiple occasions.
 
For me, the televised matches that are shown throughout the year (and the historic matches aired by outlets like the Tennis Channel), provide inspiration and practical knowledge in addition to simple entertainment.
 
So this month, I want to briefly explain how I watch a televised tennis match. There is always a method to my madness when I am viewing pros on either tour. This applies to tournaments that I cover as a photographer, but even more so, when it comes to televised matches. With the latter, I am truly able to view and review matches.
 
First, I encourage each reader to record each televised tennis match! Given the capacity of modern DVR (digital video recorders), it is not difficult to record and preserve (at least temporarily) many hours of competitive play. The only disadvantage to DVR's is that they sometimes do not allow for an easy external archiving of recorded matches. Once the internal disc drive of the DVR reaches its full capacity, these matches must either be externally preserved or deleted to allow for new program space. I have found that usually, matches recorded on a DVR can be transferred to external hard drives. I am certain that some providers may allow for "cloud" storage of this video material. It all depends on what specific DVR you may have, and what services your video provider may offer. Believe me. In the very near future, most if not all video services will provide a means to allow subscribers to upload material to a "cloud." For me, I save all the "key" matches that are important to me on very large external hard drives. My system of archiving permits me to play these saved matches on my big screen TV or on one of my computers.
 
The one advantage to the old VHS days is that all material was saved on tape cartridges. However, storing these VHS tapes took lots of physical space. I literally have over 100 matches in my VHS collection. As VHS faded away, I had to keep in my possession a player that would allow me to view these on a HD TV using a HDMI connection. I was fortunate to have purchased one before they went off the market. I have converted some of these to DVD format through a transfer that I perform on my own. But in truth, I have only done this type of transfer for the most important matches in my collection.
 
Whether you can archive your selected matches in an external manner is a question that only you can answer. However, storing matches on your DVR for as long as you can before deleting them can be useful. Truly, there are always new matches being broadcast that can be saved temporarily, analyzed and reviewed.
 
So, how do I watch televised matches? First and foremost, I watch each match without any commentary. When I am watching a live match or a match that I am seeing for the first time, I never listen to the commentators! I turn the sound off!!! I admit that this is disconcerting because I am not hearing the sound of the ball bounce or come off the players' strings. But, I want to watch the match without any interpretation. I want to come to my own insights and conclusions!!! Besides, I have viewed matches that have been televised while I was in Britain. I assure you that American tennis commentators "babble" far too much in comparison.
 
One of the things I always do when first watching a match on TV is to chart the match myself. There are quite a few apps available for iPhones. iPads and Android phones that permit accurate charting. Tennis Trakker, My Tennis Stats and e-Scorer are just a few of the more popular apps. All of these are affordable, and I do not recommend one over another.
 
Some years back, I developed a printed form that could be used for charting tennis matches. (Yes, this was back in the dark ages!!!) I have placed it below for you in case you don't want to secure an electronic app or program.
 
Charting matches keeps your "head" in the match. The problem with most charting programs in my opinion is that they do not "weigh" the type of error recorded. For example, hitting a ball into the net is much more egregious than missing a shot that is outside the baseline or sideline by a mere fraction of an inch. Yes, both are errors. But, missing by a little is very different than missing by a lot or hitting the net. So in the chart template below, you will note that I have errors and severe errors as separate categories.
 
You will see that I have sheets for Player One and for the Opponent. You keep track of each player's winner, errors, etc. Just check or circle each number as appropriate. For example if Player One has made 5 winners off the forehand wing, the first five numbers in the "Forehand Winners" category for Player One should be crossed off. If his or her Opponent has double faulted three times, the first three numbers in the "Double Faults" category should be checked off.
 
You have a "raw data" sheet for each player. Use separate sheets for each set played. So let's say that you are charting a best of five set match and it ends in three sets. You should have three sheets of raw data for each player (one for each set played).
 
At the end of the match you can tally up the totals for each set played and/or the entire match. Although the data is not converted into percentages, the raw data will give you an indication of what went right and what went wrong in each set
 
Feel free to amend my template in any manner that makes recording the raw data easier for you. In addition, you may want to include other categories. For example, you may want to record how many serve and volley points were attempted by a given player in each set.
 
In many ways, I enjoy the "old school" paper method of charting a tennis match. It reminds me of the days of my youth when I would go to professional baseball games and always keep score on my scorecard. In addition, you can save these paper charts and tally sheets in a binder for future reference.
 
Apart from using these to chart televised matches, I strongly encourage you to have someone chart your own tennis matches. You will invariably learn much about your game's strengths and weaknesses.
 
Finally, I like to make comments in the space provided in my template. For example, I may make a note that Player One was cramping in the third set. Or, I may make note that the Opponent called for the trainer to address a shoulder problem in the second set. Frequently, I make notes about anger outbursts from one or both of the two contestants. If there are challenges permitted in the match, I may make note of how many challenges the player used in a set and whether they were successful. Lastly, I may make a note to myself about tactical insights. For example, I may note that a given contestant tends to err more when he/she is forced to run. I may make note that the player tended to double fault under pressure. Really, the comment portion of my charting template is used for any insights that I have that may not be evident in the raw data and tallied results.
 

TENNIS SERVER
TURBOCHART


Player One's Name: _____________________


Date: ____________________________________________
 
Opponent's Name: _________________________________
 
Location: _________________________________________
 
Surface: __________________________________________
 
Weather Conditions: ________________________________
 
Winner: __________________
 
Score: ____________________
 
Set # 1 2 3 4 5 (USE SEPARATE SHEETS FOR EACH SET)
 
First Serves
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
 
Second Serves 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
 
Aces 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
 
Double Faults 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
 
Forehand Winners 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
 
Forehand Errors 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
 
Severe Forehand Errors 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
 
Backhand Winners 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
 
Backhand Errors 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
 
Severe Backhand Errors 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
 
Forehand Volley Winners 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 3 6 3 7 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45
 
Forehand Volley Errors 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45
 
Backhand Volley Winners 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 3 6 3 7 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45
 
Backhand Volley Errors 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 3 6 3 7 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45
 
Overhead Winners 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
 
Overhead Errors 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
 
Offensive Lobs 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
 
Defensive Lobs 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
 
Drop Shots 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
 
Net Cords 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
 
COMMENTS:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Opponent's Name: ______________________


Date: ____________________________________________
 
Opponent's Name: _________________________________
 
Location: _________________________________________
 
Surface: __________________________________________
 
Weather Conditions: ________________________________
 
Winner: __________________
 
Score: ____________________
 
Set # 1 2 3 4 5 (USE SEPARATE SHEETS FOR EACH SET)
 
First Serves
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
 
Second Serves 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
 
Aces 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
 
Double Faults 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
 
Forehand Winners 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
 
Forehand Errors 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
 
Severe Forehand Errors 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
 
Backhand Winners 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
 
Backhand Errors 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
 
Severe Backhand Errors 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
 
Forehand Volley Winners 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 3 6 3 7 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45
 
Forehand Volley Errors 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45
 
Backhand Volley Winners 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 3 6 3 7 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45
 
Backhand Volley Errors 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 3 6 3 7 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45
 
Overhead Winners 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
 
Overhead Errors 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
 
Offensive Lobs 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
 
Defensive Lobs 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
 
Drop Shots 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
 
Net Cords 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
 
COMMENTS:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

MATCH TALLIES- PLAYER 1

(Name_________________)


Total number of first serves ______
 
Total number of second serves ______
 
Total number of winners ______ (including aces)
 
Total number of errors ______ (including double faults)
 
Total number of forehand winners ______
(groundstrokes and volleys)
 
Total number of forehand errors ______
(groundstrokes and volleys)
 
Total number of severe forehand errors ______
(groundstrokes and volleys)
 
Total number of backhand winners ______
(groundstrokes and volleys)
 
Total number of backhand errors ______
(groundstrokes and volleys)
 
Total number of severe backhand errors ______
(groundstrokes and volleys)
 
Total number of games won ______
 
Total number of games lost ______
 
Comments:

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

MATCH TALLIES- OPPONENT

(Name_________________)


Total number of first serves ______
 
Total number of second serves ______
 
Total number of winners ______ (including aces)
 
Total number of errors ______ (including double faults)
 
Total number of forehand winners ______
(groundstrokes and volleys)
 
Total number of forehand errors ______
(groundstrokes and volleys)
 
Total number of severe forehand errors ______
(groundstrokes and volleys)
 
Total number of backhand winners ______
(groundstrokes and volleys)
 
Total number of backhand errors ______
(groundstrokes and volleys)
 
Total number of severe backhand errors ______
(groundstrokes and volleys)
 
Total number of games won ______
 
Total number of games lost ______
 
Comments:

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Once I have viewed a match for the first time and charted the results, I take a little time away from it. Then, I always watch the match again. This time, I watch with the sound up and I pay attention to the commentators' insights and statements. If I believe that a sound insight or tip comes forth from any commentator, I literally write the statement down.
 
In addition, I will stop and replay any portion of a match that piques my interest. Quite frequently, I will watch a slow motion "instant replay" several times. Usually, I am looking at stance, footwork, racquet preparation, weight transfer, stroke finish, etc. when I review these slow motion replays. Once again, I will make notes to myself about what I have noticed or learned from these observations.
 
At the end of my second viewing, I will attach these recorded insights to the chart sheets associated with the match.
 
The third step in my viewing analysis is to simply ask myself a most basic but very essential question: What can I take away from this match that will help me in my own tennis game?
 
Once again, I will make written notes to myself regarding the answer to this key question. Once again, I will attach these written "answers" chart sheets, tally sheets and insight or tip record for the match.
 
If I have video archived the match, I may review it years down the road. I will also review all my notes associated with the match. I will often times pull out a particular match when I see something breaking down in my game.
 
For example years ago, I taped a match that featured John McEnroe. In my tennis game, volleying is not my strength. However, I recall that shortly after this match was aired on TV, I had improved my volleys significantly by analyzing just exactly how John executes such beautiful volleys. Years later, I played a match where my volleys completely fell apart... particularly on the forehand side. I went back to the videotape of this McEnroe match and the associated chart sheets, tally sheets and notes that I had created. Sure enough, I discovered what had broken down in my volleying.
 
If you look at John carefully when he volleys, he often times "appears" to be moving backward a bit when hitting his forehand volley. Upon slow motion analysis, I noticed that he actually takes his racquet back towards his body after making contact with the ball when volleying on the forehand wing. Essentially, this minimizes his forward follow through. I recall that when I was deliberately emulating this technique year earlier, my forehand volleys were crisp and controlled. Once I reviewed the match and my compiled data, I was able to resurrect my "McEnroe-like" technique. After a practice session with the ball machine, I found that my forehand volley had returned to me.
 
I made a clear note to myself in the notebook that I carry with me in my tennis bag about this technique. I am not a natural serve and volley player. But when I compete on faster surfaces, volleying is inevitable if I am going to prevail. Before matches (and sometimes during changeovers), I will go to my tennis bag and review my notes on a particular stroke production, tactic or overall strategy. Much of what is contained in this notebook resulted from watching televised tennis matches.
 
Why not make 2016 the year that YOU begin to truly watch televised matches in a manner that will actually help your game. I assure you that if you do, you will soon become a tennis overdog!
 

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This column is copyrighted by Ron Waite, all rights reserved. Questions and comments about these columns can be directed to Ron by using this form.

Ron Waite is a certified USPTR tennis instructor who took up the game of tennis at the age of 39. Frustrated with conventional tennis methods of instruction and the confusing data available on how to learn the game, Ron has sought to sift fact from fiction. In his seven years of tennis, Ron has received USTA sectional ranking four years, has successfully coached several NCAA Division III men's and women's tennis teams to post season competition, and has competed in USTA National singles tournaments. Ron has trained at a number of tennis academies and with many of the game's leading instructors.

In addition to his full-time work as a professor at Albertus Magnus College, Ron photographs ATP tour events for a variety of organizations and publications. The name of his column, TurboTennis, stems from his methods to decrease the amount of time it takes to learn and master the game of tennis.


 

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